The Tichborne Arms Great beers, superb meals, beautiful country setting

The Village

The name ‘Tichborne’ was probably first coined in early Saxon times to denote the settlement ‘at the Itchen Bourne’ that is to say the village on the banks of the River Itchen. It remains an apt description today.

Although very small, the village is steeped in history and is inextricably bound up with the fortunes of The Tichborne family. The family have lived at Tichborne House for more than 800 years and the original house was known to be in existence in 1293.

The family have always been eminent Roman Catholics and there is a private Roman Catholic chapel at Tichborne House which was reputed to be the site of one of Henry VIII’s marriages. The village church, St Andrews, is one of only two in the British Isles to be both Roman Catholic and Protestant; each denomination having its own altar.

The story of the Tichborne Dole and arising from that, the case of the Tichborne Claimant, are so fascinating that the latter gave rise to a major feature film some years ago.

In the thirteenth century, Lady Mabella Tichborne, whilst on her deathbed, asked her husband to grant her the means of a charitable bequest. This was to be the giving of a loaf of bread to the poor on Lady Day. Heartlessly, he agreed to give for this purpose all the corn produced from land that the dying woman could walk around whilst a torch burned. Being too weak to walk she succeeded in crawling around a 23 acre field before dying. The area was thereafter named ‘The Crawls’. It is clearly identifiable today being just north of Tichborne House adjacent to the Alresford road. The dole was given every Lady Day thereafter until 1796 when it was suspended due to rowdy behaviour.

The final part of the legend then came into play. Lady Mabella had laid a curse that should the dole cease the house would fall down and the family name would die out for lack of male heirs. In 1803 part of the house fell down and the current baronet, Sir Henry, produced seven daughters and no sons. At this point the dole was resumed out of fear for the curse. Henry’s brother, James, became the 10th baronet on Henry’s death. James had two sons, Roger (the eldest) and Alfred. Roger was lost at sea in 1854 and Alfred eventually became the 11th baronet following his father’s death in 1862.  Roger’s mother didn’t give up hope that her son was still alive and in 1866 news eventually arrived from Australia that Roger had been found. Due to his appearance many thought ‘Roger’ was an imposter intent on claiming the family estates from his younger brother. Thus began what was at the time the longest and most expensive legal case in history. It ended with the judgement that he was an imposter and following another trial for perjury ‘Roger’ was sentenced to fourteen years penal servitude.

The dole was reinstated and continues to be given out to this day; a gallon of flour for every adult and half a gallon for every child in the parish. Pictures relating to the dole and the court cases can be found on the wall of the pub.

Recent News & Events

Hours

  • Mon: 11:45 - 15:00 18:00 - 21:00
  • Tue: 11:45 - 15:00 18:00 - 22:30
  • Wed: 11:45 - 15:00 18:00 - 22:30
  • Thur: 11:45 - 15:00 18:00 - 23:00
  • Fri: 11:45 - 15:00 18:00 - 23:00
  • Sat: 11:45 - 23:00
  • Sun: 12:00 - 19:30

Food Service Times

  • Monday

    Lunch 12:00 - 14:00

    Evening Kitchen closed

  • Tuesday

    Lunch 12:00 - 14:00

    Evening 18:00 - 21:00

  • Wednesday

    Lunch 12:00 - 14:00

    Evening 18:00 - 21:00

  • Thursday

    Lunch 12:00 - 14:00

    Evening 18:00 - 21:00

  • Friday

    Lunch 12:00 - 14:00

    Evening 18:00 - 21:00

  • Saturday

    Lunch 12:00 - 14:30

    Evening 18:00 - 21:00

  • Sunday

    Lunch 12:00 - 15:45

    Evening Kitchen closed

  • Menus are indicative only and subject to change. Our Set Lunch menu is available from Monday to Friday. Our ‘Sandwich and Snack’ menu is available during both the lunch and evening sessions.